Let us eat lettuce…and more

I want more to a salad than just iceberg lettuce

Some years back I told my wife, “I’m tired of the same old salad; could you make a different one?”

We both cook, though she does more of of daily cooking than I do, but salad making is my least favorite part of cooking.

Over the next six weeks she never made a salad I had tasted before; her mix and match approach led to some surprises, but I’m always happy to try new dishes and almost all of them were successes. She added edamame, sunflower seeds, unusual greens; I ate them all. I finally told her, “I didn’t mean an entirely new salad every time, just less of the iceberg lettuce, store-bought tomatoes and cucumber with familiar dressing.

We still eat salads at least once a day, sometimes as our main dish with chicken or fish added for protein. Sometimes we’ll have a brand new mixture; sometimes I can recognize we’ve had this blend before and put it on the “keeper list.”

Today I read about food companies attempts to get more Americans on the same dietary pathway. The Wall Street Journal┬áhad an article titled “The Salad Is in the Bag.” I was amazed to read that the typical US adult eats salad with a meal only 36 times a years, roughly once every ten days. Less than half of Americans eat even one “leaf salad” in meals they serve at home in a two-week period.

The two of us are clearly on the far end of that scale when it comes to salad making. Our share of this weeks’ vegetables from Grant Family Farms, our CSA, included summer squash, English peas, cabbage, carrots, kohlrabi, cilantro, parsley, green onions, a little broccoli, cylindra beets (new to us) and romaine lettuce. All of those veggies will find their way into salad

I’ve even gotten more enthusiastic about preparing some of the new salad combinations myself.

So what’s going on with the “store-bought” salad concept?

A market research group reported the biggest issue is making┬ásalads. Apparently people don’t want to take the time to wash produce, inspect it, cut it and come up with mixtures the family will eat (we won’t even get into those who abhor greenery).

So some of the major food companies are responding by making salad preparation easier. One concept being explored is adding more kinds of vegetables to bagged lettuce or spinach. That way all you have to do is buy a bag, bring it home, open it before a meal and pour the contents into a salad bowl.

Well that sounds easy, but it turns out to be a bit more complicated than the simple version. One company found wheatberries absorbed moisture; their research director spent six months resolving that issue. Then there’s the price issue; bagged salads cost more. Past history and the view of CPSI says there’s more risk of pathogen growth and therefore of food-bourne illness.

But pre-washing with newer chemical mixtures, eliminating the need for a second wash at home, may help.

A new and improved version

Salad, anyone?

 

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Reply